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The Cure For Your Anxiety May Have 4 Legs And A Cold Nose




Disclaimer: This blog post is proudly sponsored by NuCalm but all opinions are my own. NuCalm is the world’s only patented neuroscience technology clinically proven to resolve stress and improve sleep quality – without drugs. NuCalm is used by the U.S. Military & the FBI, 49 Professional Sports Teams and recommended by 98% of patients. If you aren’t familiar, NuCalm is only $29.99 a month, and they offer a 30-day risk-free guarantee. Our readers can also get 3 months free with coupon code Recharge25. As a NuCalm affiliate, we may receive compensation, if you purchase products or services through the links provided, at no extra cost to you. This helps support the running of the blog.

Imagine that you board a plane and in the seat next to yours there is a parrot, in the front seat there is a ferret and in the row across the aisle, there is a rabbit, is this all a dream? Maybe, a badass dream though, but they may also all be emotional support animals.

You've probably heard of them before, and they aren't just dogs that can fly alongside you. In the United States, they are already very common and other countries are slowly beginning to see their popularity grow. Now, what are Emotional Support Animals (ESAs)? They are just that, a pet that fulfils the function of support to a person with a condition.


“Oh, like those dogs that know how to react to the epileptic seizures of their owners!”

No, although an emotional support animal is just as cool, they are not therapeutic animals. Service animals are trained to perform specific tasks given the needs of the patient. There are dogs that know how to respond to panic attacks or acts of self-harm, those are therapy animals. Although an ESA may be trained, their role is to accompany, support and be hella cute.

Who's a good boy? Who’s a verified method for treating anxiety and other mental illnesses? You are!

A very high number of people who suffer from anxiety or depression live alone. A common factor among this population is that they tend to isolate themselves, even without realizing it. Some live with their families, be it their spouse and children or their parents and siblings, but those who do not tend to detach themselves from the people around them. An emotional support animal is the perfect companion for those who suffer from these disorders, as having a pet in home has been shown to help with anxiety levels, feelings of loneliness and motivation.


“But I don't like dogs, does that mean I can't have an ESA?” That's why they are called emotional support ANIMALS and not emotional support dogs. It can be anything from a hamster to a horse, you just have to take into account your needs and how the ESA can adapt to them. Maybe for your depression, a tiger is not the best option (and I think it is a tiny teeny bit illegal to have one in your house and dangerous by the way). Your tastes are also important to consider, maybe you’re more a dog person than a cat person, maybe when you were a child you always wanted to have a golden retriever, that could be the best option in your case.

How do I know I need an ESA and not just a pet?


The first thing you need to have an ESA is a letter from a mental health professional, therefore, you must be a person with a diagnosed disorder or medical condition. This professional can also help you choose which animal may be the most appropriate for you.

The ESA should be useful in difficult and anxious situations. If the pet you choose does not affect your emotional stability during times of anxiety or depression, then it’s not doing its job.

An ESA can mean a reduction of medication in psychiatric cases. Elements such as negative thoughts, lack of motivation and loss of appetite, can also be reduced or even completely eradicated.

Emotional support animals have proven to be successful in the following:

  • Neurodegenerative diseases

  • Bipolar disorder

  • ADHD

  • Anxiety

  • PTSD

  • OCD

I already have a pet, can it be my ESA?


For an animal to be certified as ESA it must be trained to behave in public places and with many people, your companion dog cannot be running around growling at people and peeing on every tree it sees.


Although the legislation varies from country to country, you must be able to demonstrate that this animal is capable of being around people without meaning a risk to others or to you. So it's hard for your six-foot snake to be certified to fly with you on a plane, although that may be more the fault of Samuel L. Jackson and Snakes On A Plane.


Then, a licensed psychiatrist must certify that your condition does not allow you to carry out day-to-day activities and that the presence of your pet is essential for your physical and emotional well-being.

When suffering from a mental disorder we can experience anxiety, panic, pain, fear and much more, and there is absolutely no reason why we should have to go through it alone. Keeping in touch with our loved ones has always been important when dealing with any illness, but sometimes they cannot be with us 24/7, as a pet can.


You may not suffer from any clinical illness, but a pet may be ideal for you. The companionship, unconditional love and support they give us is the same, and it may be just what we need in our healing process. So what are you waiting for, your new best friend is wagging it's tail ready to meet you.


This blog post is proudly sponsored by NuCalm but all opinions are my own. NuCalm is the world’s only patented neuroscience technology clinically proven to resolve stress and improve sleep quality – without drugs. NuCalm is used by the U.S. Military & the FBI, 49 Professional Sports Teams and recommended by 98% of patients. If you aren’t familiar, NuCalm is only $29.99 a month, and they offer a 30-day risk-free guarantee. Our readers can also get 3 months free with coupon code Recharge25. As a NuCalm affiliate, we may receive compensation, if you purchase products or services through the links provided, at no extra cost to you. This helps support the running of the blog.

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