Search
  • Bola Kwame

Am I Dyslexic; Am I Stupid

Updated: Jan 15





Disclaimer: This blog post is proudly sponsored by Mindvalley, but all opinions are my own. Mindvalley is the largest online personal growth platform in the world. Choose from hundreds of personal growth programs and transformative content taught by brilliant minds, with results that stick. Mindvalley's mission is to create personal transformation that raises human consciousness. As a Mindvalley affiliate, we may receive compensation, if you purchase products or services through the links provided, at no extra cost to you. This helps support the running of the blog.


Learning to read and write is a gradual process that begins in the early educational stages. Through early childhood education and into our formative years, these skills are perfected and then taken for granted...


I mean, everyone can read and write, right?


Both reading and writing are skills necessary to establish, progressively, more complex learning. As adults, we have automated reading and writing processes and it seems simple to us, as simple as breathing. Sadly, children and adolescents can suffer greatly if they cannot master these essential skills. There are however students who invariably make a lot of spelling mistakes, read slowly and with little precision, or simply do not understand what they have read.


Many children with learning disabilities, also called learning difficulties, struggle in school long before they are diagnosed. This can have catastrophic effects on a child's self-esteem and motivation.


Am I Stupid?


A learning disorder is an information processing problem that prevents a person from learning a skill and using it effectively. Learning disorders generally affect people with average or above-average intelligence. Yes, you heard that right! You're not 'dumb' or 'slow' or any other crappy variation.


As a result, the disorder appears as a gap between expected abilities, based on age and intelligence, and academic performance. By the way of the greatest people who ever existed, ever, like, ever ever, had a form of learning disability. I will write a follow-up post about them, as they really deserve their own post.


The Dreaded Combo

Common learning disorders affect a child's abilities in reading, writing, math, non-verbal skills, or the dreaded combo.


Learning Disorders in the academic areas of writing, reading and mathematics are very common and affect between 5 and 15% of school-age children.



When the difficulties are related to reading and writing, it is also called Dyslexia. In addition to having difficulties with literacy, some people have difficulties with mathematics and have problems doing simple arithmetic or having correct mathematical reasoning.

Read!

When learning to read or write does not have the expected progression according to the age and level of intelligence of the child or adolescent, we could be talking about a specific learning disorder.


This problem causes difficulty in learning basic academic skills during those crucial formative years, which coincides with the school stage. Basic academic skills include: reading words, reading comprehension, writing, spelling, calculating, and reasoning to solve mathematical problems.


These skills have to be taught and learned, unlike other developmental milestones that arise with the maturation of the cerebral cortex, such as walking and talking. These basic skills allow you to learn other academic subjects, such as history, mathematics, or geography.

In most children, learning difficulties are usually very evident in the early school years. However, in some cases, these difficulties may not manifest until more advanced courses when the academic demands exceed the limited abilities of the minor.

Even when basic reading skills are mastered, children may struggle with the following skills:


● Read at a typical pace

● Understand what they read

● Remember precisely what they read

● Make inferences based on what they read

● Orthography (spelling skills)


What Is Dyslexia?


It is a literacy disorder; difficulty in learning to read and write. Not all children with it have the same characteristics or the same pattern. Each person with dyslexia has specific characteristics. It is the most common learning disorder.

So How Do I Get Diagnosed...?


To make the diagnosis of dyslexia it is necessary to rule out other pathologies that justify the difficulties in reading and writing, such as a low IQ or a visual or hearing difficulty. In the vast majority of cases, dyslexia appears in people with average to above-average intelligence.


Given that certain aspects of dyslexia persist and accompany the sufferer throughout life, it is important to make an early diagnosis by a specialist in clinical neuropsychology and start treatment early. This is because the earlier dyslexia is caught, the more likely someone will be able to work on their language skills and see positive changes.

So if you think your child or anyone you know may be dyslexic, it may be worth getting a diagnosis.

Seeking Help


Early intervention is essential because the problem can get worse. A child who does not learn to add in elementary school will not be able to tackle algebra in high school. Children who have learning disabilities may also experience performance anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, chronic fatigue, or loss of motivation. Some children may misbehave to divert attention from their challenges in school.

The child's teacher, parents, guardian, doctor, or another professional can request an evaluation if there are concerns about learning disabilities. Your child will likely be tested first to rule out vision or hearing problems or other medical conditions. Oftentimes, a child will undergo a series of tests performed by a team of professionals, including a psychologist, special education teacher, occupational therapist, social worker, or nurse.

Determination of a learning disability and need for services is based on test results, input from teachers, parents/guardians, and a review of academic performance. A diagnosis of severe anxiety or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may also be relevant (ADHD). These conditions can contribute to delaying the development of academic skills.

In the meantime, be kind to those with dyslexia. Help them focus on their strengths. Encourage them to discover interests that build their confidence, allow them to flourish, for how they can flourish and change the world!


This blog post is proudly sponsored by Mindvalley, but all opinions are my own. Mindvalley is the largest online personal growth platform in the world. Choose from hundreds of personal growth programs and transformative content taught by brilliant minds, with results that stick. Mindvalley's mission is to create personal transformation that raises human consciousness. As a Mindvalley affiliate, we may receive compensation, if you purchase products or services through the links provided, at no extra cost to you. This helps support the running of the blog.

77 views0 comments